Beyond Good and Evil

"One is most dishonest towards one's God: he is not permitted to sin!"

Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil

Meera Singh: In our own half-blind process of sifting good from bad, the moral from the immoral, we have cleverly managed to keep a tight mental leash on God and His activities lest He confound and upset us with His playfulness and freedom and good cheer He shows in this evolutionary playground. For a theist, this leash is religion . For an atheist, atheism. The duality of good and bad was necessary to organize well our reality in an evolutionary world but linking it to God who is pure Oneness is to see our own muddy reflection in Him. The most difficult endeavor for a man is to see His face as is.

Comments

F. said…
Well. I always said God is a comedian.
mysticservant said…
There is an element of truth to this (and God is certainly playful), although I think morality is another way of saying 'God's will' or 'God's nature'. Although everything emanates from God, the pure Shakti/Divine Force has a particular nature. So, some things are in fact immoral, and I am of the opinion that God does not transcend morality, but that there is a different Divine morality of which human moralities have been partial expressions.
mysticservant said…
Two further points:

1. God is not capable of sin. Sin is by definition anything that goes against God's will and nature.

2. The duality between 'good' and 'bad', if it is a real duality, is merely one between what is Divine and what is anti-Divine. Although everything ultimately emanates from God, there is still a difference between something that aids the coming of the Kingdom and something that hinders it. If we define 'good' as 'coming from God', then everything is good in its origin, but if we define it as 'leading us toward God and/or manifesting His will,' then not everything is good.
meera said…
@mysticservant

There is an element of truth to this (and God is certainly playful), although I think morality is another way of saying 'God's will' or 'God's nature'.

To imprint morality on God's will or God's nature and try to be moral in the name of Divine is all well and good. One only has to practice morality zealously to realize that all it entails is a tiresome endeavour of serving human caprices in the process. Like Nietzsche who said, "Morality is the herd instinct of the individual." It is in such a disappointing realization that one begins to see morality losing all its halo.

The duality between 'good' and 'bad', if it is a real duality, is merely one between what is Divine and what is anti-Divine. Although everything ultimately emanates from God, there is still a difference between something that aids the coming of the Kingdom and something that hinders it. If we define 'good' as 'coming from God', then everything is good in its origin, but if we define it as 'leading us toward God and/or manifesting His will,' then not everything is good.

Good and bad are not Divine and anti-Divine but Nature's one of many other methods of employing antinomies to propel human life towards a greater unity. Good and bad are in themselves of little value until we realize such a duality to be an erroneous concept and all error needs to be transformed into a greater perfection. If today all humans were to renounce their bad nature, the good nature would disappear too. In its place would remain a simple Pure nature of Being.
meera said…
Sorry...I meant to write 'unless' where I wrote 'until' :)